Life Soul

Life Soul (Randyjw; November 24, 2018)

 

My life soul,

I feel your pain

and my heart beats out

rhythms synced to your name

In grief gone silent

like the whisper of breath

an unending torment

alive yet in death

 

 

 

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56 Comments

Filed under Poetry

56 responses to “Life Soul

  1. I don’t know why or how, but this got to me, both the art and the poem. I guess this is the power of true art…

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    • I don’t know, either (heh-heh), but, thanks… they were both weird, for certain.

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      • Weird is my cup of tea, and coffee too.

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        • We’re all unique, so I guess we’re all weird, too! Can’t wait for Chanukah!

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          • I am forcing my poor overworked brain: what do I send 18-year old granddaughter? Gift certificate means bailing out. She is not into shmattas or jewelry, and books are read electronically. Thinking…

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            • I’m not into jewelry, either; but I still always appreciated gifts of it, regardless that I admired them from within my jewelry box. However, the givers didn’t always appreciate my own version of jewelry appreciation. Really, I love the artistry, the design of it, the gems and minerals and learning about it, etc. So, I really did have an appreciation of it. The reason I’m writing this, is because I’m thinking of a “Chai” necklace. I think “Chai” would be significant, because of the significance of the gematria, plus the “Life” meaning. If you’re remote shopping, i.e., Israel, there are two lovely stores on Allenby Street in Tel Aviv. One is called Arazi gifts: they have all sorts of beautiful painting prints, Judaica, etc. and more. The other place is called Karpash Gems, or something like that. Maybe Kapash? They have really beautiful Magen David stars, and all sorts of beautiful charms for pendants or bracelets. Perhaps a nice chanukiyot? Her own personal Tanach? Or any of the other books? Shabbat candlestick holders? Local Judaica stores might have some items of interest, there. A trip to Israel? A nice honeypot holder, or some type of artistic bowl? Tableware? (maybe too young, yet)… My Mom and I always loved Nambe, and Michael Aram is also nice. Maybe she’s interested in taking a special class or hobby, to which you could purchase her entry? Museums or colleges often have adult instruction for art or other areas, or perhaps a one-on-one session with a personal instructor? Gym membership? Coffee table books on a subject of her interest are still nice gifts… Something you’ve made her? That’s always special (the most…). A mini-vacation? A camera, if she’s into photography…? Would she appreciate anything Russian-style? Check into Auerbach for some lovely items. Some type of vintage or modern furniture or lighting? Writing table, desk lamp (maybe even for college?) which reflects her personal style. Something from Art Basel (not sure when that is…)? A photo album or special scrapbook you’ve put together on the family? Or, even a video made from the family photos? A scarf? Maybe an idea of her dreams, interests and desires further enhanced? If you give me some ideas, maybe I can think of more…

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              • Rachel, you a a gem! Thank you so much for all these lovely ideas – you gave me so much food for thought now. I think something she could take to college that would be both memorable and useful. She is graduating this year and going to college next year. Art Basel is here in January, so that might be for graduation. But a desk lamp or any kind of a useful for college item…
                I gave her a Chai necklace for her 16th birthday, and a mini-sapphire set (her birthstone) last year. As to Russian style, her dad (my son) is working with Russians, so he gets lots of unique Russian souvenirs that are not sold here in stores. Now, something French, since she’s been there twice on student exchange and speaks fluent French.
                I cannot afford a trip to Israel, unfortunately, and she is way to busy even for mini vacations. She works at a public library, she sings in Boston Children’s Choir, and she does acrobatics. She is an accomplished – published! – poet and short story writer. What else? She plays piano and guitar (we all do, it comes in the family), and she loves drama and musicals.
                Thank you for all your brilliant ideas, Rachel, you really are the best!

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                • Oh, wow! She’s amazing! Dinner at a French restaurant and a show?
                  Cirque du Soleil has some new shows, and they’re discounted through Travelzoo; but, I’m thinking more of a keepsake item she could treasure for a long time might be better for the permanence value. I had seen some really nice Judaica items and downloaded pix, hoping to post them on my website (but they didn’t think it relevant enough); I don’t recall now the site… Maybe judaicawebstore.com? There was a filigreed matchbox cover I liked; a number of scrollwork-style shabbat candleholders; some nice jewelry, etc. If I think of more, I’ll write again on it.

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                  • I don’t know if you’d seen on my blog, but I posted about a year ago a slide show of Flying Alisia – Cirque du Soleil got nothing on her!
                    Dinner and a show – now you are thinking in my direction; I usually take her to a museum and a show, when I visit (just the two of us girls). We are planning to go in February (b’Mizrat H-shem), so that’s in the works.
                    And yes, I am thinking of something of permanent value.
                    I collect vintage Judaica (altogether, I am into antiquing), hoping, that when she inherits this stuff, she will treasure it. My candlesticks are Polish Art Deco, beginning of 20th century, and I was fortunate to get several silver besomim boxes, also Polish, that had survived the war.
                    My adopted son’s children are also my grandkids, and I love them dearly, but their mother is Moroccan Israeli, of totally different culture, so I don’t think they would even appreciate our Eastern European mementos. Glittering chachkes and chocolate Chanukkah gelt – and they will be happy.
                    Alisia is the incarnation of myself.

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                    • I know; they use wire harnesses, which is good for safety, but it also makes me think that it enhances the human ability to an unnatural state (not to knock the prowess of the artists at Cirque. I find them quite amazing). She, Alisia, has so much talent, and many interests, which is lovely. You should try my parents’ friend’s onion soup recipe, from my blog. It’s the best! It’s listed under B.F. Onion Soup. Hopefully you have crockware soupbowls to heat it in. That’s “French”. I love Art Deco. I’m glad you preserve the olden stuff (sometimes, they just don’t make ’em like they used to; and, indeed, the historical, and emotional significance of such pieces… Oy…) I go all over the place in my appreciation of Jewish art or ritual pieces, etc. I love artifacts, Yemeni filigree, Moroccan inlay, Jerusalem silver pieces, etc. I’d be just as happy with tchotchkes and chocolate as I would with a Kiddush cup. The Old City has some nice intricate fabric pieces; I had gotten a beautiful maroon top with darker same-color embroidering, as well as a beautiful yellow and many colored piece of fabric I hoped to turn eventually into a pillow. I wound up giving these items away for someone who needed gifts last-minute and didn’t have them, as well as a “genie”-style oil lamp I had gotten at the mall at the farther morthern end of the tayelet in Tel Aviv (I’m not sure what it’s called). I had found a beautiful trinket box, circular, with enameled dark blue background and gold magen david, which I had bought for my Mom, which she might use for pills or jewelry, etc. Also from Israel. Kinda running out of ideas, now. But, if I think of more…

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                    • Now that you reminded me… We brought our first Besomim box in Jerusalem. It’s a silver medieval ring with a tiny Beth haMikdash on top that swings aside to reveal besomim. Engraving on the sides reads “Ani l’dodi v’dodi li.” In Middle Ages, engaged kallahs would wear these on a chain around their necks (sort of a predecessor of today’s diamond engagement rings), to show that they are no longer available. The most incredible antique Judaica, outside Israel, is found in Florence, on Ponte Vecchio, the Renaissance Jewelers bridge. It’s not advertised in official guide books, but the entire bridge is traditionally Jewish, most stores have been in the same families since 13th – 14th century, and the bridge leads to the Jewish quarter.
                      You are a great one for ideas, dear friend!

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                    • That’s cool. A Roman Jewish girl gave a speech on base about the community that had gone there and been there for almost two millenia.

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                    • Roman Jews are altogether different. They are mostly descendants of pre-Beth haMikdash Jews. Florentine Jews came there much later, by invitation and under protection of the Medicis, escaping from Spain and Portugal. They are mostly Sephardic, Kabbalistically oriented, and, interestingly enough, daven by Nusach Ari, rather than Nusach Sefarad.
                      Two different kinds of traditions, but both fascinating.

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                    • Ah, that explains… much! You’re wonderful.

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                    • I am blushing all over the internet – why?

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                    • Haha. Kitty heart eyes.

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            • Maybe an electric pedestrian scooter? She could zip to classes or locally…

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            • Oh. I had to add this. I just went to my email and found an advert from Chabad.org stating that Tzvi Freeman’s teachings on the Rebbe, in a book he wrote called Widsom to heal the earth (or something like that), which basically says that it’s the perfect gift. Maybe? Coincidence/not? But, just had to forward that to you, because we were just “talking” about ideas for gifts, and there it was…

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  2. It is moving, Randy, the sequence through heart, rhythms, breathing, to the silence of living death. I like the textures you’re getting in your artwork: this and the previous.

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