Tag Archives: archaeology

Machaerus Mikveh Unearthed

 

Machaerus Mikveh Unearthed (Randyjw; June 23, 2017)

 

A Jewish ritual immersion pool, known by its Hebrew name of “mikveh”, has been located in the Machaerus palace complex on the eastern side of the Dead Sea, in what some people reference as today’s country of Jordan.

 

Read the interesting articles and see photos, here:

 

JNi Media. “Hungarian Archaeologists Unearth Herod’s Fortress, Ritual Bath, East of Jordan River”. June 15, 2017:

 

http://www.jewishpress.com/news/israel/hungarian-archaeologists-unearth-herods-fortress-ritual-bath-east-of-jordan-river/2017/06/15/

 

Reblog:

Mandal, Dattatreya. “Archaeologists excavate (and reconstruct) a massive ritual bath inside Herod’s fortress of Machaerus”. June 21, 2017; Realm of History:

https://www.realmofhistory.com/2017/06/21/ritual-bath-herod-fortress-machaerus/

 

Additional Reading:

 

http://www.jerusalemchai.org/education.cfm?categoryID=145&categoryName=Coins%20of%20the%20Realm%20

 

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Tiles of the Temple Found

 

As a child and throughout the all-important developmental years of my youth, I was fortunate to be raised by hard-working parents who struggled to afford me the privileges of providing cultural opportunities to enrich my growth.

 

I attended day camp and summer camp, and had occasional treats of museum or aquarium visits, the Nutcracker suite ballet (back when it was the real, visiting Russian Moscow ballet, to whom nobody has ever held a candle to, to this day), and ice shows. There were piano-, ice-skating and tennis lessons (skiing I had to pay for myself).

 

These are important things, which I think that many of today’s families just don’t bother undertaking with their children. I spent many after-school days at my friend’s house, and she was also a fixture at ours, accompanying my mother and I to an occasional outing. My favorites usually involved trips to the museum. I particularly took a shine to the polished gemstones for purchase for between $1.00-to-$3.00 in the museum’s gift shop, as did my friend, and I had a small collection of a few good rocks: micah, pyrite, and others.

 

I was also really enraptured of the Egyptian artifact collections, as well as the heiroglyphic and ancient writing systems of the ancient Middle Eastern cultures, spending some time in youthful pursuit, which is to say, not so seriously, unfortunately, in trying to learn some of these systems. Odd how it was that when my friend and I concocted our own secret alphabet code, we happened to have used some of the same symbols formulated by the ancients of old. I believe there must be some type of universal symbol usage, or perhaps more narrowly Middle Eastern, that perpetuates in ancient memories of the mind. I bet that if today’s coded kids’ alphabets were studied, they’d find the same symbols still in effect (add this to my Crazy Theory subset: #2, if I remember to do so).

 

I never extrapolated my love in my youth for the Egyptian archaeological finds early enough to realize that it could be a field of study for me, applied to Israeli/Jewish culture. Most study of archaeology in its beginnings were conducted mostly under the auspices of societies/Foundations/schools studying Egyptian, Assyrian and Hittite culture. Jews were excluded from among such groups due to anti-Semitism, and via the fact that they weren’t allowed entrance in such a capacity to those other Middle Eastern countries, anyways. Israel was still being referred to by the old designation of “Palestine”, in any case, as well.

 

In really recent times, though, I was briefly able to realize this great honor in studying Israeli archaeology via the Israeli Ministry of Tourism acceptance of me into its program of licensure to be a tour guide. In a participating academic program I enrolled in (I was unable to complete the full course of certification, due to personal circumstances I let get in the way), my course studies took me on field trips accessible only to archaeologists behind locked gates and other areas way beyond that which even the scope of a tourist trip could reveal. It was incredible.

 

One day I was watching t.v. with my mother about Israel and its sites, and there was one of my classmates, described as an expert, leading a televised tour of a particular ancient site, and I excitedly pointed him out to my mother.

 

Israel’s top archaeologists were my classroom and field guide teachers. One spoke of his Yemeni wife and related tales of his visit with the Princess of Bhutan, as he led us up mountains and past old water drainage systems cut into the hillsides. Another, whom I really related to and admired immensely, is one of Israel’s leading archaeologists. Dr. Gabriel Barkay is the archaeologist whose excavations uncovered the oldest found Biblical text, incised in proto-Hebraic script onto two silver scrolls: that of the Aharonic Blessing (one of my favorites) of Numbers 6:24-26 and the other of Deuteronomy 7:9, dating to approximately the 7th Century BCE, according to information I found at the Israel Tour Guide / Israel Tours blogsite of Shmuel Browns (read his article, below).

 

Prior to the beginning of my educational training, I participated briefly in a project known as the Temple Mount Sifting Project, where dirt which had been removed during illegal Arab construction and excavation on the Temple Mount was being sifted and combed through for any archaeological artifacts it might yield. While I did not find anything….

 

Stone tiles matching the new Roman foot measurement of 29.6 cm used by Herod such as at his other palaces, like Masada, Jericho, and Herodion, of flooring installed in the inlaid opus sectile, or “cut work” style, unknown in Israel prior to Herod’s time, have since been found of imported marble and stone from Rome, Asia Minor, Tunisia and Egypt.

 

King Herod was responsible for many great building projects throughout Israel under vasselage of the Roman Empire. The tiles dating to this time confirm the Jewish Temple having been built then (37-4 BCE, according to the information found at Breaking Israel News), and there. Other contemporaneous sources during Temple period times comes from the historian Flavius Josephus, in his First Century book, “The Jewish Wars”, who writes of the courtyard of the Jewish Temple being paved with multicolored stone, as well as Talmudic literature speaking of colors of green, blue and white. More than 100 of the 600 tiles found date to this period.

 

The timing couldn’t have been a better counterpoint to 9-11 this year (as well as BDS, EU labeling, UNESCO declaration of the Temple Mount being solely holy to our sworn enemies, etc…).

 

G-d sure does have a great sense of humor, doesn’t He?

 

See the archaeological evidence at Breaking Israel News (scroll through entire article to see the different geometrical patterns posited in reconstruction and refurbishment, about halfway down the page) at: http://www.breakingisraelnews.com/75233/first-time-ever-undeniable-evidence-jewish-temple-discovered-photos/

 

Berkowitz, Adam Eliyahu. “For First Time Ever, Archaeological Evidence Proves Jewish Temple Stood On Temple Mount [PHOTOS]”. Breaking Israel News.com; September 6, 2016: http://www.breakingisraelnews.com/75233/first-time-ever-undeniable-evidence-jewish-temple-discovered-photos/

 

Browns, Shmuel. “Ketef Hinnom Silver Amulets”. Israel Tour Guide / Israel Tours; March 16, 2011: https://israel-tourguide.info/2011/0316/ketef-hinnom-silver-amulet/

 

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Stealing Our Heritage

Stealing Our Heritage

Proverbs 3:18 in the Tanach (the Bible of the Jewish People) equivocates this statement to the Torah: She is a tree of life to them that hold fast to her. This is a very important precept to the Jewish people and they have idealized this statement with works of art (known as Judaica) to commemorate it.

Now the Palestinians are committing yet another outrage in the usurpation of our heritage by claiming the Tree of Life imagery as their own. In an August 10, 2012 story on the Global Heritage Fund webpage, the excavation site in Jericho reveals a large compound with a complete mosaic Tree of Life featured in the bath area.

Several people in antiquity, many of them Jewish Kings and dynastic rulers, have built palaces in Jericho as factual realities. Yet, the Israeli government of modern times has set the region of Jericho apart as an autonomous region for the Palestinians to live in, so the political maneuvering of history may be put forth oppositionally. One such palace in Jericho is being touted by the Global Heritage Fund as an early Islamic palace of Hisham. To me, it looks way older than when the Islamic period began (supposedly said to be in the seventh century — i.e., in the mid 600’s of the Common Era — but has anyone validated the claims of Islam to be from that era?).

Here is a website in which to view the mosaic and read the article: http://globalheritagefund.org/onthewire/blog/preserving_hishams_palace

(Update: April 3, 2019: this article no longer appears on the global heritage fund’s website; it is an upload of an archived article from oriental institute dating from 2011; the Tree of Life mosaic, with its symbolic imagery well-known in Jewish tradition, such as the gazelle [reference Psalms of Solomon, etc.], and lions [for instance, Lion of Judah, etc.], appear beneath the Tree. The photograph, noted as Image 7, is found, not within the body of the document, but located beyond document’s end, below it; which see, new link):

http://ghn.globalheritagefund.com/uploads/documents/document_2088.pdf

Here is an interesting site with information about Jewish mosaics and some pictures to look at, which you might enjoy:
http://www.neveshalom.org/html/mosaic.html

This is a Jewish mosaic panel to look at from Jordan: http://cja.huji.ac.il/Ancient/Gerasa/Gerasa-object.html

 

Update: April 3, 2019:

See this article regarding Hasmonean Dynasty era archaeology and artefacts:

World Israel News Staff. “Jericho Arabs loot Second Temple burial grounds”. worldisraelnews.com; April 3, 2019:

https://worldisraelnews.com/jericho-arabs-loot-second-temple-burial-grounds/

 

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